Impossible Language Quiz 2 (30 Questions)

1.) Cynophobia entails the fear of whaT?

2.) The English term “rubbish tip” refers to what in the United States?

3.) Gelotophobia entails the fear of what action from other people?

4.) A logophile loves what?

5.) What term describes an abbreviation formed from – and used simply as – a string of initials such as “BBC”?

6.) What word refers to a type of sofa, a type of overcoat, a brand of cigarettes and an English city?

7.) What three-letter word refers to a multi-pronged spear used for fishing or catching frogs?

8.) The Spanish term colada means what?

9.) Midwestern American dialect refers to green bell peppers by the same name as what fruit?

10.) The constellation Camelopardalis represents what animal?

11.) An agraffe represents the wire cage found around the top of what?

12.) What name refers to a water channel controlled at its head by a gate?

13.) What “A” term refers to a small cloth placed over the backs of arms of chairs to prevent soiling of the permanent fabric?

14.) Many trace the name of what game to the winter hoods of French priests: black on the outside and white on the inside?

15.) The adjective “columbine” refers to what animal?

16.) Cornobbling someone with a fish entails what action?

17.) Many experts rank what four-word phrase as the most oft-printed warning in the history of the printed word?

18.) What “R” term describes a coating of white ice that forms when water droplets in fog freeze to the outer surfaces of objects?

19.) Often in the shape of raspberries or lion’s heads, the small blobs of glass fused to a drinking glass that help provide a firm grip in the absence of a handle go by what name?

20.) Both Merriam-Webster and the American Heritage Dictionary list what as the plural form of “manservant”?

21.) Often seen with the prefices “extraordinary” or “irregular”, what term describes government-sponsored abduction and extrajudicial transfer of a person from one country to another?

22.) What name befits a bag, sack or carrying device stereotypically used by American hobos?

23.) Homonyms of a word share its pronunciation but differ in its meaning. What term describes words with the same spelling yet offer different pronunciations and meanings?

24.) What word with an obscure etymology describes a sudden, sharp increase in wind speed usually associated with active weather?

25.) The original translation of the surname Kaufmann (spelling notwithstanding) describes a person with what occupation?

26.) What name befits the digital readouts displaying the gallons and the purchase amount on a gasoline pump?

27.) An Aldis lamp most commonly serves what purpose?

28.) Many linguists attribute Theodore Roosevelt in 1898 with the first use of what word as a referral to “attaching oneself to anything likely to succeed”?

29.) What two-word Latin phrase refers to the list of main characters in a dramatic work?

30.) Similar in function to metonymy, what figure of speech whose name stems from the Greek for “simultaneous understanding” describes a term for a part of something referring to the whole of something, such as “wheels” for a car, “boots” for soldiers or “suits” for businessmen?

Answers
1.) dogs
2.) garbage dump
3.) laughter
4.) words
5.) an initialism
6.) Chesterfield
7.) a gig
8.) strained
9.) mangoes
10.) giraffe
11.) a bottle of wine or champagne
12.) a sluice
13.) an antimacassar
14.) dominoes
15.) doves
16.) striking him on the head with said fish
17.) Close Cover Before Striking
18.) rime
19.) prunts
20.) menservants
21.) rendition
22.) bindle
23.) heteronyms
24.) squall
25.) merchant
26.) totalizers
27.) Morse code signaling
28.) bandwagon
29.) Dramatis Personae
30.) synecdoche

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